Different Types Of “Cool” Jewelry Boxes

There isn’t just one type of jewelry box. Jewelry boxes come in many different shapes, sizes, and materials. Some are plain while others have multiple drawers, inlays, and ornate designs. However, if you’re looking for a cool jewelry box that also fits your jewelry storage needs, you need to first take a look at the different types of jewelry boxes available. Not all boxes can handle the amount or type of jewelry you’re looking to store. So before you purchase that cool jewelry box with all those pretty designs and hidden drawers, you first need to make sure it’s the best fit for your jewelry collection.

Jewelry Boxes for Children

Cool jewelry boxes for children come in a variety of forms. Often they’re made of thinner wood and emblazoned with popular cartoon characters. Others are made of more luxurious woods yet have a simple design. Some even have music boxes built right in.
The solution to getting a cool jewelry box for a child is to know what the child likes. If she’s into music, a musical jewelry box will be a better choice over one that has a cartoon character theme. In any case, there are a number of cool jewelry boxes for children to choose from. It all comes down to what the child considers “cool”.

Jewelry Boxes for Women

Women have a number of different types of jewelry boxes to choose from. Jewelry boxes are often crafted in luxurious woods such as maple, oak, walnut, etc. A wood jewelry box gives your collection a solid foundation and protects your pieces from the elements. Some jewelry boxes even contain glass inlays and ornate carvings. Glass and even ceramic makes of jewelry boxes are also quite popular among women and provide their own grace and beauty. Some larger jewelry boxes have multiple swinging doors and compartments, and even finely carved legs. Many jewelry boxes are lockable to protect the precious jewels inside from theft or being lost. Women have many different styles to choose from when selecting a jewelry box. However, it’s very important to match your jewelry collection with a box that will display and protect your pieces appropriately.

5 Fabulous Women’s Jewelry Boxes

Many women consider jewelry a major element in their style and fashion and often, we find ourselves looking for wonderful storage to match the collection. Jewelry boxes come in a wide range of styles, sizes, materials and shapes that all make fabulous homes for your pieces. Aside from their utilitarian nature, they also make wonderful accents to your dresser or vanity. Regardless of your style and collection, you are certain to come across one you love. Here are some of my recent favorites:

Treasury
Inspired by the movies “Labyrinth” & “The Dark Crystal”, this fantasy jewelry box was designed by Kristen Hassenfeld for Cerealart and features a musical diamond-shaped storage adorned with a silver-looking chain and held by a “crystal” base. The ornate lid has an inside mirror and opens to reveal a tiny lotus flower and a tiny swan that “swims” around the flower while the music plays. Made from plastic and resin, the interior partitions have a soft lining designed for small pieces of jewelry.

Bubinga Wood Jewelry Chest
The jewelry storage is a product from Chasing Treasure and manufactured by Jere Wright Global Ltd. It features an elm burl inlay with a gloss finish and black enamel accents. With a solid brass lock and key, it comes with an ivory velvet interior lining and an inside lid pocket. The 14 1/4″ x 9 1/2″ x 9 1/4″ box includes 3 pull out drawers (with partitions) and 2 side swing doors with inside pockets and hooks.

Queen’s Court Medium Case
A part of Wolf Designs royal collection, the leather case comes with various jewelry compartments and a removable travel case. It features a soft camel “LusterLoc” treated interior and an inside lid mirror with hidden necklace hangers. It comes in 3 different colors (crimson, bronze, and black), and have a chrome lock with key.

Sliver
A design by John Knott of Bent Fabrication, the 6″w x 15″d x 44″h jewelry box looks more like a spaceship ready to launch or an insect stuck on a piece of metal. This rather “out of the box” design is made from poplar and chrome steel in a camouflage pattern, has 5 pull-out drawers on the front, and sits on a steel stand.

Diamond Ring Packaging
A concept by Alissia Teichroew, founder and creative director of byAMT Studio, the packaging was designed for her diamond ring collection, but it can also be used as wonderful slim storage for your own rings. The boxes are made from museum board with loose layers and come in 3 different thicknesses (for 9mm, 4mm and 2mm rings). Held together by rubber bands, each piece is laser cut while the ring shape is laser etched. The packing orientation is sideways, making the ring lie flat to the engraved ring shape.

There are so many stylish and unique jewelry boxes available nowadays it’s hard to settle on just one. Whether you are keeping an awesome original jewelry packaging or investing in a more costly designer box, keeping your pieces of jewelry organized protects them from getting mixed up and tangled (and scratched!) while they enjoy their own separate “rooms.”

How the Fashion Industry Uses Social Media

Black Friday and the exclusive Fashion Weeks: Two pinnacle times of the year where retailers and the fashion industry hope to make up for a bad year or put the cherry on top of an awesome upward-driven one. But leading up to (or concluding) these championship fights for retail revenue redemption and leader-crowning, how are retailers and the fashion industry elite getting the word out about the deals or extraordinary collections that they have to sell?

America’s retailers are learning how to chime in on the conversations of their customers through social media. Whether it be Facebook or Twitter, major retailers are learning what their customers like and don’t like based on their Facebook statuses, comments and tweets. Besides using commercials, retailers like Old Navy use their Twitter page to advertise the deals and discounts currently going on in their stores.

Retailers like Cole Haan are using digital media to create aliases for their customers based on the customers’ lifestyles and embed interactive games in their social media pages to compliment these efforts. Cole Haan’s Facebook page mentions “Like us and explore more” to encourage the visitor to dive deeper into how Cole Haan clothing and accessories cater to the “Urban Explorer”.

As B Culture has mentioned before, digital media is a powerful commercialized hammer that some celebrities have wisely wielded to secure the nail in the foundation of a fruitful relationship with their fans. This is the same for high-end fashion designers. Fans of celebrities, the customers of high-end fashion designers, often like for their customers to vote for “who wore it best” and post new looks through their social media fan pages. Celebrities are often the retail industry’s initial guinea pigs and retailers use their customers’ social media comments to know what trends are hitting or missing which is a heads up to the retailer on which ones they should follow or continue to produce.

Digital media also helps high-end fashion designers get the word out about how to access a designer’s full collection, the campaign and allows the fashion industry’s supporting cast – the Press and stylists – to chime in on what they liked or didn’t like, what fashion shows they are excited to see and how the public can mix and match the designer’s pieces. Louis Vuitton has their full Spring 2012 fashion show on YouTube. Before YouTube, customers could only dream of seeing a high-end fashion show from beginning to end. The video of the above Louis Vuitton fashion show is in HD, which further gives the viewer the experience of being at the actual show.

From New York Fashion Week to a new high-end boutique opening up in L.A., fashion editors and socialites can us Foursquare to let their followers know what fashion shows and store opening they are spiriting to cover or shop next. Retailers can also use Foursquare to reward their frequent visitors with special discounts and recognition. In the image above, Jeremy P. is listed as the major of Kenneth Cole in SoHo. Foursquare makes an individual a celebrity along with the place the individual frequents.

Digital and social media has given the customer more of an immediate say in what works and what doesn’t. This gives the retailer and designer the ability to react more quickly and efficiently within their next collection. It seems social media may have accelerated the transition between fashion trends because of the swift reaction to what’s hot and what’s not. Interactive media is now the digitalized style meteorologist for the fashion industry.

How To Do Your Own Fashion PR

Having a fashion publicist is definitely worth the cost, but if you’re an emerging fashion designer, that may not be a business expense you can afford just yet. If you’re working with a zero budget for your PR campaign, don’t sweat. (Well, try not to.) Here are a few ways to get around that dilemma and pitch your fashion label on your own:

1. Do research on how to pitch effectively.

One of the biggest gripes that magazine editors have are weak pitches! If you’re going to go head-on with an editor, especially in fashion, have your pitch down to perfection as a PR professional would. Research what to say and what not to say. Know whom you are contacting by first name, last name, and title. Think of the “elevator pitch”. Can you introduce yourself and describe your company within 15 seconds? That’s how direct your pitch should be. List the basic who, what, where, why, when, and how in an easy, conversational tone, and conclude with an open-ended question about following up with you to send more information about your label.

2. Getting a follow-up and properly responding.

If you’re lucky, a fashion editor will get back to you in regards to featuring your collection in an upcoming issue. Be prepared for any requests that may be asked, i.e. designer bio, line sheets, lending agreements, or lookbook images. At this point, your lookbook or press kit should already be completed for your current collection, and make sure that it’s updated for every new season. Be swift in your responses to editors when they ask for things because they can easily move on to the next designer if you’re not keeping up with them. Remember, they have frantic deadlines and you’re considered to be on their time!

3. Sending your press release to the media.

A well-prepared press release can definitely alert the media of your new collection. Spend some time on PR distribution websites and study how the best ones are written. Follow the standard model of a press release and formulate a few paragraphs about the new release of your collection and about you as the designer. Set up a free account with press release distribution sites and schedule your releases to be sent out to the local media. You can also e-mail and fax your press release directly to news stations and newspapers (they’re always looking for local stories to cover). Who knows – what if you’re called in to be featured in a morning news segment? That’s definitely a good look for your press portfolio.

4. Invite the media to your launch party.

If you plan on celebrating the launch of your new collection, you’re responsible for securing the venue, setting up the event, and sending out media invites. It’s best to send formal invites to editors through the mail at least 3-4 weeks in advance so that gives them the opportunity to pencil you in their schedule. Fashion bloggers are also great to invite, of course. Event photos, blog write-ups, and Twitter mentions from different bloggers means more publicity for your fashion line, which you need in order to attract more customers. Make sure to save your press clips and send thank-yous to anyone doing coverage of your event.

5. Make friends with fashion stylists.

Another way to possibly have your fashion line featured in a magazine is to have a stylist hook-up. They’re always pulling clothes for photo shoots and looking for hot, new designers to work with. Get acquainted with some fashion stylists in your area by using social media and going to different fashion events in your city. It’s also good to know a lot of photographers, models, and makeup artists who can probably help get your collection used in an editorial photo shoot.

There’s so much work that goes into handling the PR side of a fashion label that more than likely should be handled by a pro. Once your label starts becoming increasingly profitable, hiring a good PR team to help you market your brand would be the best way to go. While it’s in your hands for now, do tons of research on the job of a fashion publicist and implement some of those ideas into your own marketing campaign.